Gene Role Disease OMIM Descriptions Sources
CRYBB2 causing CTRCT3 601547 The disease is caused by mutations affecting the gene represented in this entry. An opacification of the crystalline lens of the eye that frequently results in visual impairment or blindness. Opacities vary in morphology, are often confined to a portion of the lens, and may be static or progressive. CTRCT3 includes congenital cerulean and sutural cataract with punctate and cerulean opacities, among others. Cerulean cataract is characterized by peripheral bluish and white opacifications organized in concentric layers with occasional central lesions arranged radially. The opacities are observed in the superficial layers of the fetal nucleus as well as the adult nucleus of the lens. Involvement is usually bilateral. Visual acuity is only mildly reduced in childhood. In adulthood, the opacifications may progress, making lens extraction necessary. Histologically the lesions are described as fusiform cavities between lens fibers which contain a deeply staining granular material. Although the lesions may take on various colors, a dull blue is the most common appearance and is responsible for the designation cerulean cataract. Sutural cataract with punctate and cerulean opacities is characterized by white opacification around the anterior and posterior Y sutures, and grayish and bluish, spindle shaped, oval punctate and cerulean opacities of various sizes arranged in lamellar form. The spots are more concentrated towards the peripheral layers and do not delineate the embryonal or fetal nucleus. Phenotypic variation with respect to the size and density of the sutural opacities as well as the number and position of punctate and cerulean spots is observed among affected subjects. [read more] 9158139
10634616
CRYGD causing CTRCT4 115700 The disease is caused by mutations affecting the gene represented in this entry. An opacification of the crystalline lens of the eye that frequently results in visual impairment or blindness. Opacities vary in morphology, are often confined to a portion of the lens, and may be static or progressive. CTRCT4 includes crystalline aculeiform, congenital cerulean and non-nuclear polymorphic cataracts, among others. Crystalline aculeiform cataract is characterized by fiberglass-like or needle-like crystals projecting in different directions, through or close to the axial region of the lens. Non-nuclear polymorphic cataract is a partial opacity with variable location between the fetal nucleus of the lens and the equator. The fetal nucleus is normal. The opacities are irregular and look similar to a bunch of grapes and may be present simultaneously in different lens layers. Congenital cerulean cataract is characterized by peripheral bluish and white opacifications organized in concentric layers with occasional central lesions arranged radially. The opacities are observed in the superficial layers of the fetal nucleus as well as the adult nucleus of the lens. Involvement is usually bilateral. Visual acuity is only mildly reduced in childhood. In adulthood, the opacifications may progress, making lens extraction necessary. Histologically the lesions are described as fusiform cavities between lens fibers which contain a deeply staining granular material. Although the lesions may take on various colors, a dull blue is the most common appearance and is responsible for the designation cerulean cataract. [read more] 15709761
10521291
9927684
10915766
10688888
11371638
12011157
12676897
16943771
17564961
21031598
CSF1R causing HDLS 221820 The disease is caused by mutations affecting the gene represented in this entry. An autosomal dominant adult-onset rapidly progressive neurodegenerative disorder characterized by variable behavioral, cognitive, and motor changes. Patients often die of dementia within 6 years of onset. Brain imaging shows patchy abnormalities in the cerebral white matter, predominantly affecting the frontal and parietal lobes. [read more] 15117969
16648572
17121910
18814279
19934330
16337366
22197934
CTNS causing CTNSANN 219750 The disease is caused by mutations affecting the gene represented in this entry. A form of cystinosis, a lysosomal storage disease due to defective transport of cystine across the lysosomal membrane. This results in cystine accumulation and crystallization in the cells causing widespread tissue damage. Cystinosis adult non-nephropathic type is characterized by ocular features and a benign course. Patients manifest mild photophobia due to conjunctival and corneal cystine crystals. [read more]
CTSA causing GSL 256540 The disease is caused by mutations affecting the gene represented in this entry. A lysosomal storage disease associated with a combined deficiency of beta-galactosidase and neuraminidase, secondary to a defect in cathepsin A. All patients have clinical manifestations typical of a lysosomal disorder, such as coarse facies, cherry red spots, vertebral changes, foam cells in the bone marrow, and vacuolated lymphocytes. Three phenotypic subtypes are recognized. The early infantile form is associated with fetal hydrops, edema, ascites, visceromegaly, skeletal dysplasia, and early death. The late infantile type is characterized by hepatosplenomegaly, growth retardation, cardiac involvement, and a normal or mildly affected mental state. The juvenile/adult form is characterized by myoclonus, ataxia, angiokeratoma, mental retardation, neurologic deterioration, absence of visceromegaly, and long survival. [read more] 1756715
8514852
8968752
10944848
CYLD causing BRSS 605041 The disease is caused by mutations affecting the gene represented in this entry. An autosomal dominant disorder characterized by the appearance of multiple skin appendage tumors such as cylindroma, trichoepithelioma, and spiradenoma. These tumors are typically located in the head and neck region, appear in early adulthood, and gradually increase in size and number throughout life. [read more] 12190880
14632188
12950348
15854031
CYP11B1 causing AH4 202010 The disease is caused by mutations affecting the gene represented in this entry. A form of congenital adrenal hyperplasia, a common recessive disease due to defective synthesis of cortisol. Congenital adrenal hyperplasia is characterized by androgen excess leading to ambiguous genitalia in affected females, rapid somatic growth during childhood in both sexes with premature closure of the epiphyses and short adult stature. Four clinical types: 'salt wasting' (SW, the most severe type), 'simple virilizing' (SV, less severely affected patients), with normal aldosterone biosynthesis, 'non-classic form' or late-onset (NC or LOAH)and 'cryptic' (asymptomatic). [read more] 2022736
9302260
16046588
20331679
20947076
CYP17A1 causing AH5 202110 The disease is caused by mutations affecting the gene represented in this entry. A form of congenital adrenal hyperplasia, a common recessive disease due to defective synthesis of cortisol. Congenital adrenal hyperplasia is characterized by androgen excess leading to ambiguous genitalia in affected females, rapid somatic growth during childhood in both sexes with premature closure of the epiphyses and short adult stature. Four clinical types: 'salt wasting' (SW, the most severe type), 'simple virilizing' (SV, less severely affected patients), with normal aldosterone biosynthesis, 'non-classic form' or late-onset (NC or LOAH)and 'cryptic' (asymptomatic). [read more] 2808364
1714904
1515452
1740503
8396144
8245018
8345056
8027220
8550762
10720067
11549685
11836339
12466376
14671162
CYP19A1 causing AROD 613546 The disease is caused by mutations affecting the gene represented in this entry. A rare disease in which fetal androgens are not converted into estrogens due to placental aromatase deficiency. Thus, pregnant women exhibit a hirsutism, which spontaneously resolves after post-partum. At birth, female babies present with pseudohermaphroditism due to virilization of extern genital organs. In adult females, manifestations include delay of puberty, breast hypoplasia and primary amenorrhoea with multicystic ovaries. [read more] 8265607
8530621
9211678
CYP1B1 modifying GLC1A 137750 The gene represented in this entry acts as a disease modifier. Digenic mutations in CYP1B1 and MYOC have been found in a family segregating both primary adult-onset and juvenile forms of open angle glaucoma (PubMed:11774072). All affected family members with mutations in both MYOC and CYP1B1 had juvenile glaucoma, whereas those with only the MYOC mutation had the adult-onset form (PubMed:11774072). A form of primary open angle glaucoma (POAG). POAG is characterized by a specific pattern of optic nerve and visual field defects. The angle of the anterior chamber of the eye is open, and usually the intraocular pressure is increased. However, glaucoma can occur at any intraocular pressure. The disease is generally asymptomatic until the late stages, by which time significant and irreversible optic nerve damage has already taken place. [read more] 11774072